History/Culture

The Economics Of Racial Preference

Leftists wouldn’t accuse every straight white male, who isn’t a self-deprecating cuck, of white supremacy if they understood the praxeological insight that value is an expression of subjective preference.

Having a subjective preference as a white person for the company of other white people to the exclusion of others is natural and doesn’t necessitate a belief in the objective supremacy of white people over other ethnicities.

After all, Dunbar’s number applies to everyone, and “objective value” doesn’t exist. Everyone is limited in their capacity to remember details about others and thus everyone is forced to make use of heuristic judgments. That’s how our brains sort and make sense of large quantities of data so that we can make decisions and act rationally.

Even babies do it.

If we didn’t have this ability, everyone would be forever paralyzed by indecision. That people would self-segregate based on likeness is hardly surprising given that it’s been happening since the beginning of humanity.

The process of civilization itself wouldn’t be possible absent in-group preference because no one would be able to communicate fluently enough to divide labor or develop trust. In-group preference saves time and helps to avoid debilitating impediments to productivity like language and other cultural barriers.

The degree to which you interfere with the process of self-segregation through forced inclusion is the degree to which you gum up the works and piss people off.

For example, you don’t have to think country music is objectively superior to prog metal to have a subjective preference for country music to the exclusion of metal. However, if you forced your way on stage at a metal show and started playing country, it probably wouldn’t go over so well, and the quality of the experience would be diminished for everyone else.

However, if leftists understood the action axiom and the a priori truths which flow from it, they probably wouldn’t be leftists.

2 thoughts on “The Economics Of Racial Preference”

  1. If babies do something, it must be a totally rational behavior, right? But seriously, an important part of rational economic thinking is learning how to discard heuristics that do more harm than good. Would we all really be “paralyzed with indecision” if we didn’t exclusively associate with people of our own race? No. Some of us actually find other things in common with people.

    Also, it sounds a lot more like the author is talking about language than race when he says that “The process of civilization itself wouldn’t be possible absent in-group preference because no one would be able to communicate fluently enough to divide labor or develop trust.” Well that renders impossible any cooperation among various European cultures, doesn’t it? Sounds almost as if race doesn’t even matter.

    Like

    1. > If babies do something, it must be a totally rational behavior, right?

      The argument isn’t that it’s necessarily rational but rather a natural part of one’s psyche. Heuristics are how humans make sense of the world. Our brains make autonomous, heuristic judgments before we even get to the process of conscious rationalization. The amount of information processed and filtered by the subconscious mind is an order of magnitude greater than that processed and filtered by the conscious mind. I think you’re either missing the point or moving the goalpost.

      > But seriously, an important part of rational economic thinking is learning how to discard heuristics that do more harm than good.

      Like what? If you’d like to claim that this heuristic does more harm than good then fine, but you haven’t demonstrated the validity of that claim. Heuristics are judged by their usefulness. If I’m a Somali in Maine or Michigan, I can probably safely infer that the white people in my immediate proximity don’t speak a Somali language.

      If race didn’t matter and there were no cultural implications of race, this wouldn’t be possible. So clearly race can be an early indicator of a language barrier, and language barriers make communication infinitely more difficult (as anyone who has ever called Asia-based customer support knows).

      > Would we all really be “paralyzed with indecision” if we didn’t exclusively associate with people of our own race? No. Some of us actually find other things in common with people.

      That’s not the argument. The argument is that the absence of heuristics would render us paralyzed by indecision. As I already pointed out, heuristics are how our brains make sense of sense data. We literally measure intelligence by ability to recognize patterns. Heuristics aren’t limited to race, nor is race exempt from heuristic analysis. That people can find things in common with each other doesn’t mean that they won’t come into conflict in a hyper-inclusive mass democracy. Your contention is both a red herring and a strawman.

      > Also, it sounds a lot more like the author is talking about language than race when he says that “The process of civilization itself wouldn’t be possible absent in-group preference because no one would be able to communicate fluently enough to divide labor or develop trust.”

      Culture and race aren’t entirely unrelated concepts, as I’ve already demonstrated. The very existence of countries like Japan and China disprove your claim.

      > Well that renders impossible any cooperation among various European cultures, doesn’t it?

      No because European cultures are all based on Germanic languages, all of which are more complex than say… African languages. European languages and bloodlines are less dissimilar to each other than they are to say… African languages and bloodlines.

      > Sounds almost as if race doesn’t even matter.

      If anything you’ve proved my point. The lack of dissimilarity between European cultures, races, and languages facilitated the greatest boom of wealth the world has ever seen. By contrast, Africa hasn’t done so well.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s